City of Missoula grows, and what’s next for University of Montana open meetings

ParkMissoula is busy.

St. Pat’s is still in turmoil, according to this story from reporter David Erickson.

Planners talked growth Monday at Missoula City Club. That story here. Sounds like déjà vu all over again to me when it comes to the fight about growing in and up – or out and out and out. Back in 2008, or thereabouts, Missoula went through all kinds of planning, with the Urban Fringe Development Area Project and Envision Missoula, and at the time, the community notion was to grow mostly inwardly. The Growth Policy 2014 builds on the ideas, according to the city’s website.

Last week, I went to a budget meeting at the University of Montana, and it made me again curious about how the open meetings and access issue will play out for UM and the Montana University System.

The meeting was noticed, and I did get copies of the materials presented afterward. But it isn’t a given that UM will make materials available to the public, or do so in advance, as the city does.

Sooner or later, I need to follow up with Gov. Steve Bullock’s legal counsel, Andy Huff, on this topic. Huff redistributed a 2014 memo telling government agencies they need to have rules in place for public participation, as former Gov. Brian Schweitzer did.

But it’d be good to know if the Montana Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education received that directive. Huff said he wasn’t sure if OCHE got the original memo.

I’m not sure if the memo went to OCHE in 2014. The most recent distribution however occurred at an in-person meeting, and no one from OCHE was there. At chief legal counsel meetings, I typically invite only those agencies/departments under the Governor’s direct authority.

It doesn’t seem like an agency would need to wait for a directive to deal with public participation, but a spokesman for OCHE said he doesn’t believe the system is obligated to adopt such policies.

I can’t think of a time when UM has denied my request to get a copy of a document reviewed at a meeting, but I can definitely think of times people haven’t been sure whether they can provide documents that were clearly public (no names, all campus budget info), and I had to wait until well after the meeting (that wasn’t the case last week).

Also, water. The city of Missoula is taking over water projects slowly but surely, and reporter Peter Friesen has the story.

Picture is from the overlook at Milltown State Park.

  • Keila Szpaller

 

University of Montana budget isn’t straightforward

alley pic

This sunrise is from yesterday when I was walking the dog through alleys in our Northside neighborhood.

Spring is here and you can feel it. It’s lovely. This morning, we passed a couple neighbors smoking cigarettes, one on her stoop, one on the sidewalk, and you can sense people easing into the season.

In July, the seeds that we plant now will be growing like crazy, and I’m thinking about that despite my dislike for gardening. But I’m also thinking about July because that’s when I hope we’ll have better financial numbers, or more clear information, from the University of Montana about where it’s spending – and not spending – this tight fiscal year, 2017. It ends June 30, 2017.

As UM has cut its budget, professors and others have decried cuts to certain programs, and I had hoped to get a crystal clear picture of where the money has really gone over the past few years and more. Unfortunately, it’s hard to do, and there are reasons for it that I’m not going to get into much right now.

I appreciate UM offering this data, though: Expenditures by Program for Red Tape. At the very least, it shows that since the 2008 fiscal year, a couple colleges have grown like mad. Dean Roberta Evans heads the Phyllis J. Washington College of Education and Human Sciences, and she didn’t return my requests for comment in time for the story, but I receive an email from her today about the significant growth in her area. But she’s had to cut as well, and Evans said this in the email:

Doing more with less is incredibly difficult; I can’t begin to tell you how inspiring it is to see brilliance, creativity and enduring commitment in outstanding colleagues who devote their careers to fulfilling students’ academic dreams, despite the sacrifices involved.

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The good and the ugly

foliageLet’s start with the latter.

Last week, I made a large error in a controversial story. We’re not supposed to repeat mistakes, but I’ll tell you I included in a story as fact something that was a hoax and questionable anyway. (OK, now, of course, I have to repeat the error: The Mormon church has plans to buy Utah State University. It does not. Perhaps it would like to offer me a buyout to never take pen to pad again.)

The error was inconsequential to the story, but it was consequential for credibility, so I apologized to my colleagues at our meeting Tuesday. Now, I’m doing the same to readers here.

The good? Well, there’s lots of good. I took that picture sitting at the University Center. Neat plants, especially this time of year.

Also, I visited with a beetle researcher at UM, Diana Six. That story here. In short, beetles might be helping the forest evolve even as they devastate it. Really.

I’d like to share more, but I’m going to keep this one short.

All for now.

– Keila Szpaller